Courtney Barnett & San Fermin Mikhael Paskalev

Thursday, October 23 2014
7:00 PM Door | 8:00 PM Show

Upstate Concert Hall 1208 New York 146
Clifton Park, New York 12065

The First 102 are $10.27
$13 Adv | $15 Day of Show
On sale at all Ticketmaster Locations, The Club Box Office, and The Northern Lights Smoke Shop


Courtney Barnett:

  After years toiling away as a guitarist in other-people’s bands, Courtney Barnett finally gained the courage to step out as a solo artist less than two years ago. Gathering together a bunch of like minded friends, she recorded a debut EP of rambling garage pop and began life as a front-woman.
  That EP ‘I’ve Got A Friend Called Emily Ferris” received glowing reviews in her home country of Australia but that trickle of critical acclaim turned into a river of praise upon the release of her second EP “How To Carve A Carrot Into A Rose”.
  While the sprawling guitar jams of her band “The Courtney Barnetts” barely hide her remarkable pop sensibility it’s Courtney’s honesty, wit and unique turn of phrase that set her apart from the rest. Reviews range from calling her “The next queen of Australian rock and roll” to just wanting to be mates with her, “I’ve only ever met her once but I can tell she’s a legend.”

San Fermin:

  San Fermin is the work of Brooklyn composer and songwriter Ellis Ludwig-Leone. His self-titled debut album is strongly influenced by his unique background in classical music, which includes a job assisting composer/arranger Nico Muhly.
  After finishing his musical studies at Yale, Ludwig-Leone wrote the album in six weeks while holed up in a studio on the mountainous border between Alberta and British Columbia. He focused on life?s top-shelf issues – youth, nostalgia, anxiety, unrequited love – and tied these vast themes to different characters through vocal contributions from longtime friend Allen Tate, as well as Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig of Lucius.
  The first track released from the album, “Sonsick,” tackles many of these larger themes head-on. ”It’s like a panic attack disguised as a birthday party,” Ludwig-Leone says. ”I realized that the most intense moments are the ones in which conflicting emotional worlds exist inside you, equally, at once.”

(Source: Agent Provided)